Todd Tobias

Todd Tobias“it’s tribute to Todd Tobias’s skill as a producer and arranger that the pace never slackens and that he’s quite effectively produced the audio equivalent of a graphic novel, one that will keep you listening right up until its cataclysmic final moments.” DOA

After years of producing Guided By Voices and playing in Circus Devils with Robert Pollard, Todd Tobias branched out on his own, producing a string of themed instrumental albums for Hidden Shoal, each one unique in its evocation of an imagined world. His music is defiantly unique and vividly realised across his evolving discography.

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Discography

 

Moonchy & Tobias – ‘Une Saison En Enfer’ (Single)


September 2018

‘Une Saison En Enfer’ is the 1st single lifted from Moonchy & Tobias, an electrifying collaboration between Italian vocalist Pat Moonchy and American instrumentalist Todd Tobias. The album will see release on November 2nd 2018 through Hidden Shoal and Tiny Room Records.

 

Todd Tobias & Chloe March – Amialluma


September 2018

After a number of stunning track collaborations on Todd Tobias’s 2015 album Gila Man, Chloe March and Todd Tobias have joined forces on their new full-length, Amialluma. Following on from Tobias’s recent album Massabu Evening Entertainments and March’s own Blood-Red Spark, this new album brings both artists’ distinct musical sensibilities together to create a bewitching brew. Dwelling in a mysterious hinterland somewhere between Cocteau Twins’ seminal Victorialand and The Caretaker’s Persistent Repetition of Phrases, Amialluma dances between the earthly and heavenly. Chloe March’s celestial voice shines a light through Todd Tobias’s dark, fantastical soundscapes, resulting in a sublime, uncanny experience that enraptures and unsettles in equal measure.

 

Massabu Evening Entertainments

March 2018 This time Tobias breaks out a rollicking set of Middle-Eastern flavored psychedelia. Massabu’s 13 breathless tracks evoke a night club grotto in some exotic port town filled with wild dancers and intoxicating fumes. Tobias is joined on three tracks by Italian vocalist Pat Moonchy, who lends a playful, otherworldly touch.

Gila Man

18 October 2015 Each Todd Tobias solo album presents its own discrete, surreal world – and Gila Man is no exception. A wordless musical novella that merges a psychedelic Western with shadowy science fiction, Gila Man simultaneously evokes the wide-eyed wonder of discovery and the creeping dread of what horrors may lurk around the next corner. Featuring the stunning wordless vocals of English songwriter and fellow Hidden Shoal artist Chloë March, the album is at once beautiful and unsettling – and a wonderful distillation of the magical qualities of Tobias’s previous musical outings. Gila Man’s individual songs vividly evoke characters and scenes within the album’s imaginary narrative, casting dusty projections onto the mind’s eye. Breezily meditative single ‘Pollen Path’ shimmers with acoustic fingerpicking and Chloë March’s celestial voice. ‘Howler’s Hill’ breaks out of its haunted intro into an agitated, fuzzy churn, while ‘Queen Mab’ circles around synth and chime motifs to create a delicate, melancholic dirge. ‘Tularosa’, again featuring Chloë March, is woozy, French-sounding atmos-pop. ‘Highlake’s Last Stand’ pits dreamy guitar wanderings against ritualistic sludge rock. Wherever this music ventures, the listener is compelled to follow.

Tristes Tropiques

June 2015 While best known for producing Guided By Voices and collaborating with Robert Pollard (Circus Devils, Ricked Wicky and Pollard’s solo material), Tobias has also crafted an innovative body of instrumental solo work, of which Tristes Tropique is the latest chapter. Hypnotic and melancholy-soaked, Tristes Tropique presents a luxuriant yet downcast tone, drawing comparisons to the eerie, transportive work of The Fun Years, The Gentleman Losers and Ian William Craig. This is no better exemplified than on single ‘Suvarnabhumi’, in which sparse, yearning guitar figures are subsumed by ethereal synths. Sinister yet alluring, these musical environments throb with sensuality, danger and promise. Tristes Tropique takes its title from the book by French anthropologist Claude Levi Strauss, which literally translates as “sad tropics”. Tobias sought to evoke far-flung places where indigenous cultures have either vanished or are in the process of being swallowed up by an ever-expanding global civilization.

Moorea

June 2015 Moorea is the stunning companion EP to Todd Tobias’s brilliant 2015 album Tristes Tropiques.

Impossible Cities

October 2014 Impossible Cities is the latest visionary chapter in Todd Tobias’s ongoing exploration of rock’s darkest and most hypnotic realms. Inspired by the Ital Calvino book Invisible Cities, each track is named after an imaginary city, from the glistening exoticism of ‘Lamura’ via the seething murk of ‘Gorgum Reeth’ and ‘Smazbaal’ to the eerie, shimmering grandeur of ‘Akrova’, Tobias’s latest musical universe is vividly rendered, scary, beautiful and utterly immersive. The album comes with the companion mini-album Impossible Cities 2, which comprises 10 haunting vignettes.

Impossible Cities 2

October 2014 Impossible Cities 2, comprising 10 haunting vignettes, is the free companion mini-album to Todd Tobias’s Impossible Cities.

I Razor (featuring Circus Devils)

May 2013 I Razor, by Todd Tobias and Circus Devils, is the soundtrack to the no-budget experimental feature film of the same name directed by Todd Tobias. The I Razor soundtrack comprises challenging, playful, twisted, murky and downright beautiful pieces of music by Todd Tobias and Circus Devils, featuring vocals from Robert Pollard (Guided By Voices) as well as instrumental versions of some of the Devil’s existing songs. The album is a cinematic feast within itself, uncompromising, redemptive and always engaging. It weaves lo-fi keyboards through shimmering guitar textures, scatters unsettling rhythms across ethereal synthscapes, and unveils kaleidoscopic new treasures among its 30+ tracks with each listen. Told from the perspective of a former scientist turned wandering telepathic man-child, I Razor is the story of one man’s quest to regain his lost humanity.  I Razor presents its world in hallucinatory visions, reflecting the state of mind of its main character.  The story is told with minimal dialog and an open plot structure, relying instead on visuals and music to carry it’s narratives.

Night Above Ground

November 2012 In contrast to Medicine Show‘s serpentine construction and intense atmosphere, Night Above Ground is more airy, accessible and playful, bursting into vivid life with the crowd chatter and tumbling noisescapes of ‘Invocation’. Immersive, hypnotic tracks such as ‘Crystal Palace People’ alternate with brief, impressionistic pieces such as ‘Workshop of Spears’ and ‘Ashes and Cream’. The EP’s 17 minutes flow past your third eye like a Dali-esque dream.

Medicine Show

April 2012 After years of producing Guided By Voices, playing in Circus Devils with Robert Pollard, and helping to create the music for Pollard’s solo albums, Todd Tobias is striking out on his own with his debut solo album. Defiantly unique and vividly realised, Medicine Show is a multi-faceted instrumental opus, evoking a shadowy steampunk dystopia. By turns nightmarish and hauntingly beautiful, the three-dimensional musical universe that Tobias conjures across 40 minutes is totally addictive. From the dark GBV-esque groove of ‘Night of the Club Foot’, through the gaseous synths of ‘Pre-Dawn Visitation’, evoking a hallucinogen-fuelled walk among a misty moon-lit forest, to the visceral lurch of single ‘Manatoc Enters The City / The Long Fall’, Medicine Show plays out like the soundtrack to a Terry Gilliam movie starring Tom Waits, each song a totally immersive scene, leading inexorably into the next.

Biography

Todd Tobias grew up in Northeast Ohio, USA, where he played in a string of bands, culminating in Circus Devils, alongside fellow Ohioan, Robert Pollard of Guided by Voices. In 2002, Todd began producing albums with Pollard, beginning with Guided by Voices’ Matador release Universal Truths and Cycles. Todd has also produced many other indie-rock projects over the years, including fellow Hidden Shoal artist Kramies.  While playing in bands as a drummer or bassist, he continued work on his own with a cassette 4-track, creating soundscapes and his own brand of exotic rock, as showcased in his prolific work with Circus Devils.  In 2012, Todd finally birthed his first solo work for Hidden Shoal, titled Medicine Show, followed by Impossible Cities (2014) and Tristes Tropiques (2015), each of which has been accompanied by a companion EP.

 

News

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Reviews

  • Moonchy & Tobias ‘ La Bete Et La Belle’ Reviewed at Dark Life Experience

    [Translated via Google. Original text here.]

    “Pat Moonchy and Todd Tobias bring with the song “La Bete Et La Belle” a piece of music that stands out with its experimental nature of the mainstream. The mix of psychedelic and dark industrial mood captures the listener but at the latest with the supremely versatile voice Moonchys, skillfully exploiting every facet, height and depth. Yeah, you only hear Moonchy sing in the song. In addition to the featured song, you should definitely listen to the same name album of the band, because as for the versatility of the duo, you get here the full overview. A journey through the most diverse, beautiful musical landscapes worthwhile.”

    Dark Life Experience

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed by Craig Laurance Gidney

    “A collaboration between musicians Todd Tobias and Chloë March, Amialluma is an album’s worth of atmospheric ambient music that desultorily drifts between a whimsical and eerie tone. All ten compositions have a distinct hauntological ambiance. The soundscapes have the feel of the soundtrack to a forgotten children’s movie. Music box melodies, echoed bell-like tones and 60s Sci-Fi sounds are woven together, mostly in a halcyon mood that gets disturbed by the occasional dark chord progression. March sings, purrs, trills, murmurs and chants words in an invented language that manages to be both soothing and disturbing, like a feral child raised by nature. The resulting suite (which is how it is supposed to be listened to) reminds of me of the work of the English band Pram, (who share a similar tonal palette crossed) with the Cocteau Twins at their most tranquil.”

    - Craig Laurance Gidney

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  • Moonchy & Tobias Reviewed at Here Comes The Flood

    “Over the last couple of years Todd Tobias released a bunch of atmospheric soundscapes, telling stories without words. His new album is a collaborative effort with Italian avant-garde singer Pat Moonchy, whose voice is not a vessel for lyrics per se, but more of a solo instrument. her almost childlike operatic delivery is a contrast for Tobias music that can be harsh at times, but also be gently flowing like a brook in Spring.

    Moonchy & Tobias is an intense listening experience and untrained ears will have trouble withe the dissonance and dark mood that lays like a heavy blanket on top of the tracks. The music buzzes and crackles (not to mention that it can be a bit frightening as well). The duo might have invented a whole new genre with this album: operatic post-psychedelic avant-garde that needs be explored more often in the near future.”

    - Here Comes The Flood

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  • Moonchy & Tobias ‘Vertigo Trail’ Reviewed at Left Bank

    “Italian-American duo Moonchy & Tobias craft a slow, drifting mechanical soundscape with a wide variety of musical texture. The song starts off with avant-garde samples, ripping, soft-tapping on wood, and a little tape hiss. As the song begins it’s march, fuzzy guitar squelches under the mix adding a chunky crackle. Soft organs play a stagnant, clean drone of chord change. A dilapidated slot machine-like sample slips quietly in every now and then. On the left channel lies most of the slinky and memorable rhythms. The clean bass, coupled with hollow, bouncy synths join together to play the songs most dominant riff. Moonchy’s ethereal vocals are a nice, melodic high-end to the mucky, sharp instrumentation. The production is focused and tight, clearly showing a producer who is not only inspired but precise.

    The song crafts a pungent atmosphere, but does not wish to necessarily make the listener comfortable, and right when Moonchy starts to piece together melody that is contained and rhythmic, it trails further off into peculiarity. And I like that. The whole piece gives me the feeling as though I’m being led wistfully through a sort of haunted, abandoned industrial plant by the ghost of a young girl. And in that sense, every little part in the song feels like a piece of old, dead machinery, coming back alive, only briefly, to welcome me. It’s the vast imagination-in-a-bottle sort of stuff that is an understated testament to music’s magic.”

    Left Bank

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  • Todd Tobias and Chloe March ‘Ma Leila Lulla’ Reviewed at Tome To The Weather Machine

    “One time Robert Pollard collaborator and Ohio-based soundscape designer of bright acoustic instrumentation and brooding, droning tones, Todd Tobias and UK vocalist/collaborator Chloë March pull down a sense of mysterious calm on their first single from their collaborative record. It’s easy to imagine these tracks unfurling like morning fog across a heavily wooded valley. The uneasy drone and ebullient acoustic guitar settling in among the nestles and leaves of trees in that low place.”

    Tome To The Weather Machine

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed at Textura

    “If there’s one word that describes Amialluma, a thoroughly enrapturing collection by English vocalist Chloë March and American instrumentalist Todd Tobias, it’s bewitching. It’s not the first time the two have joined forces, March having earlier guested on his 2015 set Gila Man, but it is the first time they’ve shared equal billing on an album—a fitting gesture as both of their contributions are integral to the musical outcome and its narcotizing effect. Known for his work with Guided by Voices, Tobias is the less familiar textura presence of the two; March, on the other hand, has been mesmerizing us with her vocal gifts and atmospheric songcraft for many years now, most recently with her superb solo outing Blood-Red Spark.

    One thing about Amialluma in particular merits immediate mention, that being the duo’s decision to have March sing newly invented words in place of a known language—a critical and brilliant choice, critical in allowing the music to sever any and all connections to real-world content and relatedly brilliant in bolstering the ethereal, dream-like character of the music. Yes, the move does understandably invite comparison to a similar approach adopted by Cocteau Twins, yet Amialluma never feels derivative or as if the duo’s following a path laid out by another. Amialluma carves out its own distinct and self-contained space, one deeply celestial in tone.

    Tobias’s gauzy, keyboards-based soundscapes sever earthly ties from the moment “Lillavva” establishes the album’s heavenly aura, which is bolstered even more when March’s soft, sensual utterances appear; the aptly lulling “Ma Leila Lulla” and serene closer “Cherra Leilahi” drift like gently floating clouds of choral whispers and fragile vocal musings. In some cases (e.g., “Shehehs”), Tobias’s ambient soundscaping exudes a brooding, industrial-ambient quality that suggests darker spaces have been entered, a quality that March naturally responds to in kind.

    She’s in exceptionally fine voice throughout, and demonstrates remarkable invention and a bold absence of inhibition in the myriad vocal effects—coos, stutters, trills, and the like—she drapes across her partner’s backings. In “Lallulow,” she metamorphs before one’s ears from a human form into something more abstractly creature-like, whereas “Inttavei” sees Tobias crafting a mysterious minimal backdrop for her to emote against, the singer responding to the sound design with upward swoops and entranced murmurings.

    Text in the accompanying press release suggests that a narrative of sorts was conceived for the release involving a child’s journey from the safe haven of its mother’s care through shadowy realms that are eventually overcome. Truth be told, I’d rather pretend no such narrative exists in order to allow the music to most deeply inhabit its own enigmatic space sans grounding in conventional human experience. March’s voice and Tobias’s music together communicate perfectly well on their own self-defined terms, and no real-world representational anchor’s needed to enhance the presentation.”

    If there’s one word that describes Amialluma, a thoroughly enrapturing collection by English vocalist Chloë March and American instrumentalist Todd Tobias, it’s bewitching. It’s not the first time the two have joined forces, March having earlier guested on his 2015 set Gila Man, but it is the first time they’ve shared equal billing on an album—a fitting gesture as both of their contributions are integral to the musical outcome and its narcotizing effect. Known for his work with Guided by Voices, Tobias is the less familiar textura presence of the two; March, on the other hand, has been mesmerizing us with her vocal gifts and atmospheric songcraft for many years now, most recently with her superb solo outing Blood-Red Spark.

    One thing about Amialluma in particular merits immediate mention, that being the duo’s decision to have March sing newly invented words in place of a known language—a critical and brilliant choice, critical in allowing the music to sever any and all connections to real-world content and relatedly brilliant in bolstering the ethereal, dream-like character of the music. Yes, the move does understandably invite comparison to a similar approach adopted by Cocteau Twins, yet Amialluma never feels derivative or as if the duo’s following a path laid out by another. Amialluma carves out its own distinct and self-contained space, one deeply celestial in tone.

    Tobias’s gauzy, keyboards-based soundscapes sever earthly ties from the moment “Lillavva” establishes the album’s heavenly aura, which is bolstered even more when March’s soft, sensual utterances appear; the aptly lulling “Ma Leila Lulla” and serene closer “Cherra Leilahi” drift like gently floating clouds of choral whispers and fragile vocal musings. In some cases (e.g., “Shehehs”), Tobias’s ambient soundscaping exudes a brooding, industrial-ambient quality that suggests darker spaces have been entered, a quality that March naturally responds to in kind.

    She’s in exceptionally fine voice throughout, and demonstrates remarkable invention and a bold absence of inhibition in the myriad vocal effects—coos, stutters, trills, and the like—she drapes across her partner’s backings. In “Lallulow,” she metamorphs before one’s ears from a human form into something more abstractly creature-like, whereas “Inttavei” sees Tobias crafting a mysterious minimal backdrop for her to emote against, the singer responding to the sound design with upward swoops and entranced murmurings.

    Text in the accompanying press release suggests that a narrative of sorts was conceived for the release involving a child’s journey from the safe haven of its mother’s care through shadowy realms that are eventually overcome. Truth be told, I’d rather pretend no such narrative exists in order to allow the music to most deeply inhabit its own enigmatic space sans grounding in conventional human experience. March’s voice and Tobias’s music together communicate perfectly well on their own self-defined terms, and no real-world representational anchor’s needed to enhance the presentation.

    Textura

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

    [Translated via Google. Read the original here.]

    “For some years now the paths of Chloë March and Todd Tobias had come to cross the respective elliptical trajectories, united by the creation of imaginary soundscapes but both very heterogeneous and unpredictable. Their collaboration finds for the first time organic results in the form of a fully shared album, which given the profile of the two artists can not but arouse curiosity about the point of balance they have identified between their respective complex expressive profiles.

    Well, “Amialluma” does not disprove expectations, dispensing along all its ten tracks the facets of an imaginary microcosm, brushed by the two artists making extensive use of improvisation, in particular that of the enchanted vocalizations of Chloë March. Drawing on the more ethereal and dreamy side of his expressiveness, the German artist elaborates a sort of angelic cantilery made up of pure harmonic essence, so as to renounce any form of substantial meaning, according to a modality that inevitably refers to the Cocteau Twins. However, affinity also lends itself to the atmospheres on which they lie, resulting from intricate textures, which amplify their dreamlike nature through fluctuating synthetic layers, modulated reverberations and a changing blanket of microsubes.

    The constant recombination of these elements directs the songs of “Amialluma” now in a caressing harmonic direction, now towards a hallucinated environmental dimension, though diluted by the delicate conceptual trace underlying the work, inspired by an idea of ​​instinctive interaction between man and nature . The pure creative instinct is precisely what animates the meeting between Todd Tobias and Chloë March, in a conjugation of languages ​​condensed into sound sketches that really keep the daring promise with which the album is presented, or conjugate the fragile grace of the Cocteau Twins with the complex mental processes of The Caretaker: centered goal, in the form of a sequence of gently restless lullabies.”

    Music Won’t Save You

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March ‘Lallulow’ Reviewed at Trust The Doc

    “Chloë March has been a favourite of mine ever since I first heard her unique music on the Tom Ravenscroft Show on BBC Radio 6 Music. That was a few years ago and, in the time since, she has continued to write and record engaging, ethereal music that is difficult to categorise, drawing on classical, psychedelic, prog, folk, eastern, jazz and other flavours united by her otherworldly voice, soulful brooding melodies and clever impressionistic arrangements. All these qualities are strongly in evidence on Lallulow, the single she has released with ambient producer Todd Tobias which I have had the privilege of receiving as a pre-release promo. It’s a taster for their collaborative album due out in September and on it Chloë gets to take the ‘voice as instrument’ concept a stage further with warbles, rattles and invented words that add to the aura of the track and hint at a Cocteaus influence which is music (sic.) to my ears. Set against synth chords, evocative strings and an overall sense of breaking waves and drifting white clouds, her voice floats effortlessly and occasionally soars too. Excited about the album? You bet.”

    Trust The Doc

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  • Todd Tobias “Massabu Evening Entertainments” Reviewed at Music Will Not Save You

    [Translated via Google. Read the original here.]

    “A new adventure through unusual soundscapes led Todd Tobias to discover the complexity of aromas and suggestions of a Middle Eastern psychedelic with distinctly imaginary traits. It is an exotic parallel universe that concentrated by the American artist in the thirteen short traces of “Massabu Evening Entertainments”, resulting from a centrifugal of alienating rhythms and vapors, brought by an equally imaginary band that to a classic electric instrumentation, associates vintage organs and instruments of the oriental tradition.

    The hallucinated vocalizations of Pat Moonchy and Chloë March enhance the effect of alienation resulting from a sequence of spasms and vibrating impulses, which orients the visionary exoticism already manifested by Todd Tobias in ” Tristes Tropiques ” (2015) towards horizons of restless surrealism , still all to be explored.”

    Music Will Not Save You

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  • Todd Tobias “Gila Man” Reviewed at Festival Info

    [Translated from the Dutch via Google. Read the original here.]

    “Was his previous album, Tristes Tropiques, though mysterious, now Todd Tobias throws at Gila Man still just a little extra. The ever prolific Tobias addition to his work as a producer also include solo underway, and not the least pace. His albums are also very diverse. Tobias picks an overarching theme, but varies within the boards a lot.

    As the cover suggests, Gila Man contains a lot of music that is inspired by the ‘Wild West’. The song ‘Howler’s Hill “is an example. The song begins with a constructive mix of guitar and electronics, and eventually degenerates into an explosion of psychedelics. The whole brings tension with it, certainly show through the dark electronic being performed. A guitar accompanies the whole with different tones and rhythms. Next song ‘High Lake’s Last Stand’ sounds correct again very hopeful and very diverse. The different ways in which guitar, tempos, and synthesizers are used, making the original number. Something quite different compared to previous records, is the fact that Tobias has contributed vocals. The English songwriter Chloe March brings soft and melodic vocals played and that’s all certainly benefit. The song is also something Gila Man distinguishes positive towards Tobias’ previous records.

    The plate is nowhere the same, and it shows. “Popskull Kid ‘plays, for example a lot of strange electronic sounds, making it sound as if the aliens suddenly the’ Wild West ‘invaded. For that matter does the sound of the album is also very reminiscent of the atmosphere of the thriller part of the new series Westworld. The board picks actually perfect the exciting and airy moments together, by building occasionally correct voltage, but also by passing quiet (ambient) elements. “Pollen Path ‘is an example in which the listener exactly what more rest will be awarded.

    The conclusion is therefore that on this album shines diversity. Tobias throws so many elements in the mix, it’s impossible to get bored. Throws it a good dose of fantasy in, then this album is at its best.”

    Festival Info

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Licensing

Todd Tobias’s music is  available for licensing (master & sync cleared) through Hidden Shoal. Please contact us with some basic details about your project and the track(s) you wish to use and we’ll be sure to get back to you straight away.

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