Chloë March

Chloe March“a luminous voice, a smoky alto that unfurls like a plume of cigarette smoke, its velvety tone a sensual narcotic… it’s hard not to think of the mythological sirens who used their hypnotic voices to lure sailors ashore”textura

Oft compared to singular artists such as Nina Simone, Beth Gibbons and Elizabeth Fraser, Chloë March follows her own independent path, writing, engineering and producing from her home studio in south-east England. Inhabiting musical territory somewhere between art song and folk, dream-pop and electronica, the ambient and the cinematic, March embraces all these influences to create poetic, emotionally charged and intensely atmospheric songs and soundworlds.
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Discography

 

Snow Bird (Single)


December 2018

Following on from her 2017 solo release Blood-Red Spark, and her recent collaboration with labelmate Todd Tobias, Amialluma, ‘Snow Bird’ is a luminous winter song, gently hypnotic and hopeful. The track melds dream pop and found sounds of birdsong to create a crisply detailed emotional landscape, inhabited by March’s uniquely emotive vocal.

 

Todd Tobias & Chloe March – Amialluma


September 2018

After a number of stunning track collaborations on Todd Tobias’s 2015 album Gila Man, Chloe March and Todd Tobias have joined forces on their new full-length, Amialluma. Following on from Tobias’s recent album Massabu Evening Entertainments and March’s own Blood-Red Spark, this new album brings both artists’ distinct musical sensibilities together to create a bewitching brew. Dwelling in a mysterious hinterland somewhere between Cocteau Twins’ seminal Victorialand and The Caretaker’s Persistent Repetition of Phrases, Amialluma dances between the earthly and heavenly. Chloe March’s celestial voice shines a light through Todd Tobias’s dark, fantastical soundscapes, resulting in a sublime, uncanny experience that enraptures and unsettles in equal measure.

 

 

Blood-Red Spark

December 2017 In her fourth album, Blood-Red Spark, March continues her exploration of a rich musical seam in which songwriterly storytelling and imagistic soundscape meet. Beautiful ambient/electro-pop soundworlds of warm spaciousness and radiant sensuality are underpinned by a compelling pulse – a vital heartbeat of an album of emotional concealments and revealments, truth and trickery, loss, longing and desire. March leads the listener through an immersive multi-layered world of melodic twists and unexpected harmonic shifts with the confident songcraft of a composer happily at home with her own distinctive musicality, occasionally  reminiscent of Goldfrapp, C Duncan, The Cocteau Twins or David Sylvian, using her voice as intimate centre point and textural instrument. The single ‘Let It All In’ is at the heart of this intimacy, distilling the emotional magnetism that March brings to all her work into an intense shot of magic and liquid melancholy.  Blood-Red Spark is further evidence of an artist gathering her musical forces and transforming them into shimmering gold.

The Orpheus Pavement

March 14 2016 The Orpheus Pavement is the new six-track EP by English artist Chloë March, featuring new song ‘The Orpheus Pavement’, along with two originals from her acclaimed album Nights Bright Days and three remixes (by Lvmark, Sam Atkin, and Chloë March). The Orpheus Pavement is dreamy, slow-motion pop music, pulsating with sensuality. Listening to the EP feels like surreptitiously ingesting laudanum and wandering half-dazed through a secret garden that’s slowly shifting and warping around you. As with so much of Chloë March’s work, it was inspired by the mythical – the largest Roman mosaic ever found in Britain, which depicts Orpheus charming nymphs, tigers and other creatures with his songs. In this instance, the story is just the start, as March’s compositions bloom from reverberating piano and voice into evocative soundworlds that contain multitudes. Two of the songs are further transformed by remixers Lvmark, Sam Atkin, and March herself, into shimmering refractions of their former selves. Lvmark is an electronic music producer hailing from Northern Sweden, drawing influence from the isolation and vastness of his homeland to create echoing electronica. Sam Atkin is a Fremantle-based ambient and experimental producer operating out of his shed-bedroom, who released his debut album Gently, Quietly in 2015 through Workplace Safety CDRs, and has been keeping it slow and sad ever since.

To Set The River On Fire

February 2015 The new EP release To Set The River On Fire opens a window into a new universe of possibilities: Hidden Shoal artists remixing each other’s music. In the first of what we hope will become an ongoing series, English dream-pop artist Chloë March takes on a track from the latest album by German experimentalist Markus Mehr – and vice versa. Listening to ‘Buoy (Chloë March Remix)’ feels like watching Chloë March creep tentatively into Markus Mehr’s shadowy soundworld, casting her radiant voice around the room like torchlight. While on ‘Ember (Markus Mehr Remix)’, the original’s beautifully simple arrangement for voice and piano is trapped within a hall of industrial-sized mirrors, anxiously roving around in search of escape. Each remix complements the other, masterfully re-interpreting the source material while inviting fresh listens to the original.

Nights Bright Days

November 2014 Although often compared to singular artists such as Nina Simone, Beth Gibbons and Elizabeth Fraser, Chloë March follows her own unique path, writing, engineering and producing from her studio in south-east England. Inhabiting musical territory somewhere between art song and folk, dream-pop and electronica, the ambient and the cinematic, March embraces all these influences on Nights Bright Days to create poetic, emotionally charged and atmospheric songs and soundworlds. Four years in the making and originally self-released in 2013, Nights Bright Days is a cycle of songs as dreams, imbued with imagery of darkness and light, night and day. The album embraces elements of jazz, classical, folk and dream-pop, and features guest musicians on bass clarinet, soprano sax, French horn and guitar. Nights Bright Days features single ‘Winter Deep’, a shimmering waltz that opens the album with weightless grace.The Hidden Shoal re-release also includes the bonus digital EP Under The Day which features six previously un-released tracks.

Under The Day

November 2014 A set of daydreams that form a miniature B-side to the album Nights Bright Days, this is a collection of six songs including the piano ballad ‘May’ and the dream-folk synth/harp reverie for the oldest tree in Kew Gardens ‘Old Tree, Mon Coeur’ that garnered Chloë Soundclouder of the Day earlier in 2014 – ‘Dreamy voice… A magical atmospheric song’. The new songs on this EP include ‘Ballooniad’ inspired by tales of the early Balloonists lifting off from coastal cliffs, a dreamily buoyant track tethered to a circling bass and ‘Big Tree Engine’ a minimalist reflection centred around deep jazz-inflected piano chords inspired by an ancient tree in central London.

Politik

July 2012 Chloë was commissioned to compose a score for the dance-theatre piece realPolitik, choreographed by Julie Hope and performed at the Michaelis Theatre, London in 2008.   realPolitik was a re-working of The Green Table, a tanztheater piece created by German choreographer Kurt Jooss in 1932. The Green Table explored political corruption and the futility and horror of war. This modern version also concentrated on those issues, focusing on modern warfare and personal power-plays between characters.   Inspired by composers such as Walton, Weil and Stravinsky, Politik mixes orchestral drama with intricate and atmospheric electronica and weaves texts from A. E. Housman and Jonathan Swift into the score as spoken word elements. Highly atmospheric and emotionally involving, Politik offers an evocation of the 1930’s era of the original piece with a dynamic contemporary twist.

Garden On The Boulevard

November 2009 Garden On The Boulevard is a collection of six songs that includes tracks inspired by boulevard cafés and old cameras, lost love and seductive glamour, the dawn chorus, mythical bees, ghosts in the garden and frozen lakes.

Divining

November 2008 Chloë spent three years writing, recording and producing her second album Divining (2008). Inspired by water and featuring Chloë’s trademark poetic lyrics and immersive, cinematic soundworlds, Divining journeys through immersive sensuous soundscapes including a decaying Venice, a lament for Anne Boleyn, nostalgic sunlit reveries, tales of sadistic sculptors, grieving wolves and dark seas of love and loss.

With the piano at it’s heart and interweaving french horn, strings, marimbas and found-sounds including wind-chimes, paper and grass, this is a meticulously and lovingly-crafted album with a haunting, melancholic undertow.

 

Snowdrop

November 2004 Chloë March’s first album includes pared-down ballads for piano and voice and her first explorations into more epic, multi-layered highly evocative soundworlds. “Sophisticated songwriting… a trace of David Sylvian’s jazz-tinted sound…The utterly gorgeous melody and March’s singing are exceptional. Snowdrop is a thing of beauty.”Collected Sounds

Biography

Chloë March has always lived a life with music at its heart. She grew up as part of a musical family, with both her parents musicians at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Her mother’s daily practice of playing Chopin, Beethoven, Debussy and Schumann pieces on the piano was the soundtrack to her young life, and March began piano lessons aged four. Later, after her parents divorced, songwriting and improvising on the piano became vital to her. Her early life was steeped in classical and jazz, with raids on her siblings’ record collections revealing wondrous new worlds created by Kate Bush, Pink Floyd and Joni Mitchell, which led to the discovery of David Sylvian, the Cocteau Twins and Steve Reich, all of which influenced her own music. Playing in bands with her brother and spending time in his 8-track home studio sparked a passion for recording, particularly for building up soundscapes with the texture and depth of multi-tracking. This early experimentation forged a determination to be in control of her own recording at home, with her current digital set-up only occasionally disrupted by her cat, musicologist partner, and various guest musicians. March’s long, slow discovery of her singing voice has been an odyssey of sorts, gradually finding the confidence and freedom to reveal a jazz-inflected alto that has been variously described as “absolutely charismatic”, “mesmerising” and “luminous”.

Inspired by myth, history, fairytales, books, film and the sensuality of the natural world, with an obsessive attention to detail and a desire to create intensely atmospheric and emotionally truthful music, March has been recording and producing her own music since she released her second album Divining in 2008. Prior to Divining, she toured the UK and Italy as keyboard player with the band Cousteau, released her first album Snowdrop in 2004, and composed for theatre and dance, including the 40-minute electro-orchestral soundtrack Politik. March has also worked with German ambient producer Jumpel, singing on his 2010 single ‘Edinburgh’ and four songs on his 2013 album Bloc4. Her latest album, and her first for Hidden Shoal, Nights Bright Days, has been four years in the making. It was initially inspired by the night and metamorphosis, and became a cycle of songs as dreams, imbued with images of darkness and light. The album embraces jazz, classical, folk and dream-pop influences, and features guest musicians on bass clarinet, soprano sax and guitar.

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Reviews

  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed by Craig Laurance Gidney

    “A collaboration between musicians Todd Tobias and Chloë March, Amialluma is an album’s worth of atmospheric ambient music that desultorily drifts between a whimsical and eerie tone. All ten compositions have a distinct hauntological ambiance. The soundscapes have the feel of the soundtrack to a forgotten children’s movie. Music box melodies, echoed bell-like tones and 60s Sci-Fi sounds are woven together, mostly in a halcyon mood that gets disturbed by the occasional dark chord progression. March sings, purrs, trills, murmurs and chants words in an invented language that manages to be both soothing and disturbing, like a feral child raised by nature. The resulting suite (which is how it is supposed to be listened to) reminds of me of the work of the English band Pram, (who share a similar tonal palette crossed) with the Cocteau Twins at their most tranquil.”

    - Craig Laurance Gidney

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  • Todd Tobias and Chloe March ‘Ma Leila Lulla’ Reviewed at Tome To The Weather Machine

    “One time Robert Pollard collaborator and Ohio-based soundscape designer of bright acoustic instrumentation and brooding, droning tones, Todd Tobias and UK vocalist/collaborator Chloë March pull down a sense of mysterious calm on their first single from their collaborative record. It’s easy to imagine these tracks unfurling like morning fog across a heavily wooded valley. The uneasy drone and ebullient acoustic guitar settling in among the nestles and leaves of trees in that low place.”

    Tome To The Weather Machine

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed at Textura

    “If there’s one word that describes Amialluma, a thoroughly enrapturing collection by English vocalist Chloë March and American instrumentalist Todd Tobias, it’s bewitching. It’s not the first time the two have joined forces, March having earlier guested on his 2015 set Gila Man, but it is the first time they’ve shared equal billing on an album—a fitting gesture as both of their contributions are integral to the musical outcome and its narcotizing effect. Known for his work with Guided by Voices, Tobias is the less familiar textura presence of the two; March, on the other hand, has been mesmerizing us with her vocal gifts and atmospheric songcraft for many years now, most recently with her superb solo outing Blood-Red Spark.

    One thing about Amialluma in particular merits immediate mention, that being the duo’s decision to have March sing newly invented words in place of a known language—a critical and brilliant choice, critical in allowing the music to sever any and all connections to real-world content and relatedly brilliant in bolstering the ethereal, dream-like character of the music. Yes, the move does understandably invite comparison to a similar approach adopted by Cocteau Twins, yet Amialluma never feels derivative or as if the duo’s following a path laid out by another. Amialluma carves out its own distinct and self-contained space, one deeply celestial in tone.

    Tobias’s gauzy, keyboards-based soundscapes sever earthly ties from the moment “Lillavva” establishes the album’s heavenly aura, which is bolstered even more when March’s soft, sensual utterances appear; the aptly lulling “Ma Leila Lulla” and serene closer “Cherra Leilahi” drift like gently floating clouds of choral whispers and fragile vocal musings. In some cases (e.g., “Shehehs”), Tobias’s ambient soundscaping exudes a brooding, industrial-ambient quality that suggests darker spaces have been entered, a quality that March naturally responds to in kind.

    She’s in exceptionally fine voice throughout, and demonstrates remarkable invention and a bold absence of inhibition in the myriad vocal effects—coos, stutters, trills, and the like—she drapes across her partner’s backings. In “Lallulow,” she metamorphs before one’s ears from a human form into something more abstractly creature-like, whereas “Inttavei” sees Tobias crafting a mysterious minimal backdrop for her to emote against, the singer responding to the sound design with upward swoops and entranced murmurings.

    Text in the accompanying press release suggests that a narrative of sorts was conceived for the release involving a child’s journey from the safe haven of its mother’s care through shadowy realms that are eventually overcome. Truth be told, I’d rather pretend no such narrative exists in order to allow the music to most deeply inhabit its own enigmatic space sans grounding in conventional human experience. March’s voice and Tobias’s music together communicate perfectly well on their own self-defined terms, and no real-world representational anchor’s needed to enhance the presentation.”

    If there’s one word that describes Amialluma, a thoroughly enrapturing collection by English vocalist Chloë March and American instrumentalist Todd Tobias, it’s bewitching. It’s not the first time the two have joined forces, March having earlier guested on his 2015 set Gila Man, but it is the first time they’ve shared equal billing on an album—a fitting gesture as both of their contributions are integral to the musical outcome and its narcotizing effect. Known for his work with Guided by Voices, Tobias is the less familiar textura presence of the two; March, on the other hand, has been mesmerizing us with her vocal gifts and atmospheric songcraft for many years now, most recently with her superb solo outing Blood-Red Spark.

    One thing about Amialluma in particular merits immediate mention, that being the duo’s decision to have March sing newly invented words in place of a known language—a critical and brilliant choice, critical in allowing the music to sever any and all connections to real-world content and relatedly brilliant in bolstering the ethereal, dream-like character of the music. Yes, the move does understandably invite comparison to a similar approach adopted by Cocteau Twins, yet Amialluma never feels derivative or as if the duo’s following a path laid out by another. Amialluma carves out its own distinct and self-contained space, one deeply celestial in tone.

    Tobias’s gauzy, keyboards-based soundscapes sever earthly ties from the moment “Lillavva” establishes the album’s heavenly aura, which is bolstered even more when March’s soft, sensual utterances appear; the aptly lulling “Ma Leila Lulla” and serene closer “Cherra Leilahi” drift like gently floating clouds of choral whispers and fragile vocal musings. In some cases (e.g., “Shehehs”), Tobias’s ambient soundscaping exudes a brooding, industrial-ambient quality that suggests darker spaces have been entered, a quality that March naturally responds to in kind.

    She’s in exceptionally fine voice throughout, and demonstrates remarkable invention and a bold absence of inhibition in the myriad vocal effects—coos, stutters, trills, and the like—she drapes across her partner’s backings. In “Lallulow,” she metamorphs before one’s ears from a human form into something more abstractly creature-like, whereas “Inttavei” sees Tobias crafting a mysterious minimal backdrop for her to emote against, the singer responding to the sound design with upward swoops and entranced murmurings.

    Text in the accompanying press release suggests that a narrative of sorts was conceived for the release involving a child’s journey from the safe haven of its mother’s care through shadowy realms that are eventually overcome. Truth be told, I’d rather pretend no such narrative exists in order to allow the music to most deeply inhabit its own enigmatic space sans grounding in conventional human experience. March’s voice and Tobias’s music together communicate perfectly well on their own self-defined terms, and no real-world representational anchor’s needed to enhance the presentation.

    Textura

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March “Amialluma” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

    [Translated via Google. Read the original here.]

    “For some years now the paths of Chloë March and Todd Tobias had come to cross the respective elliptical trajectories, united by the creation of imaginary soundscapes but both very heterogeneous and unpredictable. Their collaboration finds for the first time organic results in the form of a fully shared album, which given the profile of the two artists can not but arouse curiosity about the point of balance they have identified between their respective complex expressive profiles.

    Well, “Amialluma” does not disprove expectations, dispensing along all its ten tracks the facets of an imaginary microcosm, brushed by the two artists making extensive use of improvisation, in particular that of the enchanted vocalizations of Chloë March. Drawing on the more ethereal and dreamy side of his expressiveness, the German artist elaborates a sort of angelic cantilery made up of pure harmonic essence, so as to renounce any form of substantial meaning, according to a modality that inevitably refers to the Cocteau Twins. However, affinity also lends itself to the atmospheres on which they lie, resulting from intricate textures, which amplify their dreamlike nature through fluctuating synthetic layers, modulated reverberations and a changing blanket of microsubes.

    The constant recombination of these elements directs the songs of “Amialluma” now in a caressing harmonic direction, now towards a hallucinated environmental dimension, though diluted by the delicate conceptual trace underlying the work, inspired by an idea of ​​instinctive interaction between man and nature . The pure creative instinct is precisely what animates the meeting between Todd Tobias and Chloë March, in a conjugation of languages ​​condensed into sound sketches that really keep the daring promise with which the album is presented, or conjugate the fragile grace of the Cocteau Twins with the complex mental processes of The Caretaker: centered goal, in the form of a sequence of gently restless lullabies.”

    Music Won’t Save You

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  • Todd Tobias & Chloe March ‘Lallulow’ Reviewed at Trust The Doc

    “Chloë March has been a favourite of mine ever since I first heard her unique music on the Tom Ravenscroft Show on BBC Radio 6 Music. That was a few years ago and, in the time since, she has continued to write and record engaging, ethereal music that is difficult to categorise, drawing on classical, psychedelic, prog, folk, eastern, jazz and other flavours united by her otherworldly voice, soulful brooding melodies and clever impressionistic arrangements. All these qualities are strongly in evidence on Lallulow, the single she has released with ambient producer Todd Tobias which I have had the privilege of receiving as a pre-release promo. It’s a taster for their collaborative album due out in September and on it Chloë gets to take the ‘voice as instrument’ concept a stage further with warbles, rattles and invented words that add to the aura of the track and hint at a Cocteaus influence which is music (sic.) to my ears. Set against synth chords, evocative strings and an overall sense of breaking waves and drifting white clouds, her voice floats effortlessly and occasionally soars too. Excited about the album? You bet.”

    Trust The Doc

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  • Chloe March ‘Wild Cherries’ Reviewed at BBC6

    “…a track that completely blows me away every time… a song of outstanding natural beauty… from her totally extraordinary fourth album ‘Blood-Red Spark’ ”

     
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  • Chloe March ‘Calypso Wants’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

    “Utterly enchanting, snow fallen beguilement courtesy of Chloe March. Second single from her recent Hidden Shoal full length ‘blood red spark’, this be ‘Calypso Wants’ – a beautifully harvested lunar lullaby delicately tripped and teased in the subtle spray and vibrant fusion of jazz noir dialects, torch lit tailoring and ethereal electronic murmurs all sweetly stationed between the flutter by advances of Laetitia Sadier and the dreamy demurs of Musetta and Heather Duby, simply arresting.”

    The Sunday Experience

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  • Chloe March “Blood-Red Spark” Reviewed at Textura

    “Chloë March’s many strengths are on full display throughout her fourth full-length Blood-Red Spark. On the album’s twelve tracks, her first-rate songwriting skills are well-accounted for, as is the English artist’s talent for crafting compelling instrumental backdrops. But as we’ve noted in the past, it’s March’s singing that is her music’s strongest selling-point: she’s got one of those one-in-a-million voices that could make even the most pedestrian lyric feel like cause for rapture. That being said, as integral as her vocalizing is to the album’s impact, Blood-Red Spark would hardly merit a recommendation if the songs and arrangements weren’t compelling, too.

    March shares with a small number of other female vocalists—Anne Garner, Trish Keenan, Elizabeth Fraser, Tracey Thorn, and Susanna Wallumrød come to mind—a vocal delivery that’s never less than alluring. Luminous, sensual, seductive—all such epithets apply to March’s singing; whether presented as an unadorned lead or as harmonizing choir, her voice is the key that unlocks an intimate soundworld straddling dream-pop, trip-hop, and electronica. For the record, Blood-Red Spark was wholly created by March at her home studio, with a gritty electric guitar turn by Geoff Bennett on “So (Together)” the album’s sole guest contribution.

    The resplendent, deeply atmospheric character of March’s music is in place the moment “Orchardie” inaugurates the album, her sultry, multi-tracked vocalizations complemented by a shimmering electronic arrangement. Lyrically many songs center on relationships, love, and intimacy, with songs such as “No Game” (“That’s enough of the reveries / I want to be real, right now”), “Let It All In” (“Let it all in / This is where the heart begins”), and the title track (“Your good heart leads me through the dark / Everything around you a shimmer of blood-red spark”) exemplifying March’s desire for emotional directness and connection.

    Another listener might conceivably complain that the songs hew too much to a common tempo, but to these ears the slower BPM allows March’s voice to work its magic most fully. While her electronica side moves to the fore during “Mercury Trick” and “Signal Flow,” she offsets the music’s chilly synthetic timbres with the warm humanity of her voice. Nowhere is its effect more ravishing than in “Calypso Wants” where her weave of lead vocal and harmonies achieves an effect that’s positively celestial. Here and elsewhere, the effect of her languorous delivery is enhanced by the luxuriant backings she fashioned for the songs.

    - Textura

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  • Chloe March ‘Calypso Wants’ in Underground of Happiness Best of 2017

    “The latest album by Chloe March is another heady trip through electro pop but really that tag doesn’t do justice to the range of expression. The air is thick with atmosphere throughout and March is a masterful creator of mood. This is just one of the stunning rarefied synth compositions topped with layers of her remarkable voice. I particularly love the dappled pulse of electric piano when the pace picks up for the chorus. It is also a beautiful sound somewhere between The Blue Nile and David Sylvian and as that would suggest very soulful. Wonderbar.”

    - Underground of Happiness Best of 2017

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  • Chloe March “Blood-Red Spark” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

    [Translated from the original Italian via Google]

    “On the fourth album, Chloë March does not stop dispensing the charm of her soothing vocal harmonies, which in the twelve tracks of “Blood-Red Spark” become even more ethereal and evanescent than ever.

    Set aside the velvety jazzy settings of ” Nights Bright Days ” (2014), the sound flow that supports the interpretations of the English artist is no longer made up of real arrangements, but rather of constant layers of synth whose lightness recalls the magic of Cocteau More delicate twins.

    Simplicity and intimacy seem to be the key words of the work, which however do not contradict the refined refinement of the current expressive dimension of Chloë March, a well-established muse of dilated dream-pop spells.”

    - Music Won’t Save You

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Licensing

Chloë March’s music is  available for licensing (master & sync cleared) through Hidden Shoal. Please contact us with some basic details about your project and the track(s) you wish to use and we’ll be sure to get back to you straight away.

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