Medard Fischer “Lucky You” Reviewed at EtherREAL

[Translated from the French via Google] “Re-appeared after seven years without news last year with an album of Arc Lab, Medard Fischer also starts publishing under his own name, still on Hidden Shoal Recordings he had already joined for his other project, and still in digital version only. For this release, the Australian abandons the neo-classic that he had indulged in the past, to embrace a beautifully enveloping electronica-ambient, made of superposition of tablecloths able to mislead the listener in their intertwining. Eager to play on the somewhat random character of combinations that can give the simultaneous presence of different components, Medard Fischer manages to create meetings capable of instilling an atmosphere between relaxation and a mini-vertigo ( No Input ). While the virtual absence of rhythm could give rise to fear of a form of evanescence a little too pronounced, the addition of some micro-saturations or “electronic winds” ( You Can not Be Gone If You Were Never Anywhere To Start , Pretty title besides) brings more consistency to his compositions. The piano can also reappear, to confer a different color, more free in its style of play ( Fundamentals ) or much richer in melodic contribution ( Measured Time ), just as some electronic chromatic scraps know how to pull the set to a look more childish ( Everything Will Become Light Some Day ) or that features seem comparable to those of a guitar treated (the title track). This series of descriptions shows that, while maintaining a good homogeneity, Medard Fischer succeeds in diversifying its purpose, by the grace of sufficiently varied materials from one title...

“Eat Your Friends” Compilation Reviewed at DOA

“Over almost a decade, Hidden Shoal records developed a reputation as a consistently innovative and experimental music label, giving to us music of remarkable qualities whether it was the instrumental excursions of Gilded, the blissed-out indie of My Majestic Star, the electronica of Marcus Mehr, the alt.folk stylings of Kramies – the HSR list of significant talents was a lengthy one. I say was, as in 2014 or thereabouts, the Hidden Shoal label underwent a reorganisation of sorts, and it began to seem that one of the more influential Australian record labels of the recent past was itself going into hiding. Perhaps so, although only to return refreshed, renewed, invigorated and with its varying artistic visions intact – the Eat Your Friends compilation proves that the Hidden Shoal label is properly with us again. One thing I’ve found when reviewing compilations is that not infrequently, when I put them into my music players, the tracks separate instead of remaining in their album folder, and that has happened with my copy of Eat Your Friends, encouraging me to view each of the tracks as a single release rather than view the album itself as a cohesive whole. Then there’s the fact that only some of its contributors are already known to me and so, ditching some of my preconceptions about what it’s going to sound like, I began listening to the 11 tracks in a random sequence, and prepared for the unexpected. Firstly, there’s singer/songwriter Erik Nilsson’s “Moksha Can Wait”, a song which electronic composer Marcus Mehr has taken and adapted to his subtly developed production sound, a track that begins almost inaudibly and builds to a staggering crescendo of soaring, roaring...

Arc Lab “Anthem” Reviewed at EtherReal

“No news of Fischer Medard (either under his own name or through one of his other projects) since 2009, was as pleased as surprised to learn that reactivated his alias Arc Lab for a new album. Published in digital only, Hidden Shoal, this long-format allows the player to return to the electronic land (after the neoclassical interlude constituted by the EP under his own name) and even back even further back, since the thirteen songs on the album work in a somewhat dated register, marked by the presence of synths and rhythmic supported. As such, the first are sometimes a bit “mushy” seeking a “psyche” inheritance (WVVS, All These Worlds Are Yours) while the latter occasionally venturing into more techie shores or if parent and saturations distortions (Boundary). Fortunately Medard Fischer knows, each time offset these tendencies by adding a lighter melody sounds more air or a more impulsive musical phrase (Through The Burning Glass, Tidal, M-Set). Similarly, the introduction in the middle of album, a short track mainly played the piano, provides a form of welcome breathing (Aurora Signals). Other items from breaking the continuum in place, sound clips from NASA and old radio programs conversations are used both as voice materials as sources of crackling and additional fragmentations (Necessary Concepts, The Refracting Glass). The assembly then enrolled in this announcement that Arc Lab as a “science-fictional travel retrofuturist” way to confirm that the musician look both behind and in front of him, bit obvious but overall successful year.” – EtherReal Related Items:Medard Fischer "Lucky You" Reviewed at EtherREALErik Nilsson "The Imperfect Tense" Reviewed at EtherRealMedard Fischer -...

Arc Lab “Anthem” Reviewed at Luna Kafe

“Arc Lab is the project of Canadian artist Medard Fischer (who has also been recording under his own name, check f.i. Four Songs for the City of New York). Fischer has also been working in the duo Down Review. However, Anthem sees Fischer return to his Arc Lab sound laboratory, as it’s been eight years since the last Arc Lab full-length album, 2008’s The Goodbye Radio (for the n5MD label). The Goodbye Radio was described as ‘genre-defying’ or ‘genre-transcending’ (by Textura Magazine, Canada) and as ‘one of the most original releases in the IDM field in some time’ and ‘downright ingenious’ ([sic] Magazine, Belgium). So, zip your Launch Entry Suit, put your helmet on, buckle up, and get ready for countdown, ignition and launch. Arc Lab’s new album, the fourth in the Arc Lab discography, has been tagged ‘a retrofuturistic sci-fi travelogue’ by the Hidden Shoal label. Throughout the almost hour-long Anthem, the Arc Lab multistage rocket presents us for its 13 tracks deep into the electro-ambient outer fields. This is minimalist electronic dance music with brains and substance, given us through a string of chapters: “The Golden Record”; “W V V S”; “Through the Burning Glass”; “New Frontiers”; “Boundary”; Aurora Signals”; “Tidal”; Necessary Concepts”; “See You There”; “Broadcast 1,679”; “M-Set”; “The Refracting Glass”; “All These Worlds Are Yours”. It sounds like an epic journey, right? Fischer lists a long line of artists as his influences, such as Steve Reich, Henryk Górecki, Boards of Canada, Autechre, Underworld, Plaid, The Notwist, Jóhann Jóhannsson, Max Richter, DJ Koze [who recently played Oslo’s ØYA festival] to name but a few. According to...

Arc Lab ‘Through The Burning Glass’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

i’m picking up Boards of Canada in a love in with Plaid happenings here and I’m cranking up the head phones and falling deep into wave forming wooziness, frankly it’s all too irresistible. This sound heads, is a teaser taste from a forthcoming Hidden Shoal lovely by Arc Lab entitled ‘through the burning glass’ – a single in fact culled from a planned ‘Anthem’ full length due sometime July end. To the emergence of oncoming pulsing shimmer tones, a stately alignment is forged whereby celestial fanfares tap out their love noted siren calls across the galactic voids much like a heavenly cavalry heading over the cosmic hills led from the fore by a bliss bathed Battles festooned in kosmiche kisses fired upon the hypnotic purr of motorik murmurs.

Arc Lab ‘All These Worlds Are Yours’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

Mentioned Arc Lab a few weeks ago in readiness of a forthcoming release entitled ‘Anthem’ through hidden shoal due July end, not that I’m suspecting you need nudges or the slight arm twist of persuasion but another of its gems has been leaked with the appearance on our listening radar of ‘all these worlds are yours’. As though emerging from the dark side of slo-mo docking alignment of Warm Digits and Art of the Memory Place types, this divinely demurred slice of starry eyed dreaminess is showered in the seductive spray of sonic sun spotting activity all propelled and purred by the head bowed grace fall of vintage kosmiche.