“Eat Your Friends” Compilation Reviewed at DOA

“Over almost a decade, Hidden Shoal records developed a reputation as a consistently innovative and experimental music label, giving to us music of remarkable qualities whether it was the instrumental excursions of Gilded, the blissed-out indie of My Majestic Star, the electronica of Marcus Mehr, the alt.folk stylings of Kramies – the HSR list of significant talents was a lengthy one. I say was, as in 2014 or thereabouts, the Hidden Shoal label underwent a reorganisation of sorts, and it began to seem that one of the more influential Australian record labels of the recent past was itself going into hiding. Perhaps so, although only to return refreshed, renewed, invigorated and with its varying artistic visions intact – the Eat Your Friends compilation proves that the Hidden Shoal label is properly with us again. One thing I’ve found when reviewing compilations is that not infrequently, when I put them into my music players, the tracks separate instead of remaining in their album folder, and that has happened with my copy of Eat Your Friends, encouraging me to view each of the tracks as a single release rather than view the album itself as a cohesive whole. Then there’s the fact that only some of its contributors are already known to me and so, ditching some of my preconceptions about what it’s going to sound like, I began listening to the 11 tracks in a random sequence, and prepared for the unexpected. Firstly, there’s singer/songwriter Erik Nilsson’s “Moksha Can Wait”, a song which electronic composer Marcus Mehr has taken and adapted to his subtly developed production sound, a track that begins almost inaudibly and builds to a staggering crescendo of soaring, roaring...

perth Reviewed at DIY Magazine

“It’s impossible to leave out a band that is literally named after the city behind this piece; luckily they’re a super talented instrumental experimental four-piece. There are hints of electronica, shoegaze and psychedelia, all meshed into intense build-ups, washed-out vocals and heaps of Explosions In The Sky-level of emotion. Even with plenty of minimal moments, the haunting loops and walls of sound will drag you into the riptide of their cinematic world.” – DIY Magazine (“The best new artists coming out of Australia’s most isolated city” Feature) Related Items:Lunar Landscape 'Les nuits célestes' Reviewed at The RevueKramies Featured in Atwood MagazineLiminal Drifter "Connected" Reviewed at Happy MagKramies 'The Hill Dweller' Reviewed at Vents MagazineLunar Landscape "The Infinite Pleasure of Being" Reviewed at The Joy of Violent...

PERTH “Where’s My Dystopia?” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

Translated from Italian by Google Translate. Read the original here. “It is not a simple rehash of songs already released one below for “Where’s My Dystopia?” Organic work that shuffles the cards last effort of the Australian Perth quartet, ” Where’s My Utopia? “(2013). The already kaleidoscopic original matter here is not simply transformed, but placed at the base of ten tracks from radically new forms, each of which emphasizes different profiles. To prevail, however, is undoubtedly the most dreamy and space, summarized in synthetic trails brilliant and visionary drifts kraut. Among the participants of the ambitious project worth a mention GUM (Jay Watson of Tame Impala) and our Valerio Cosi. Beyond the banality of remixes.” – Music Won’t Save You Related Items:Chloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed at Music Won't Save You"Moonchy & Tobias III" Reviewed at Music Won't Save YouTodd Tobias & Chloe March "Amialluma" Reviewed at Music Won't Save YouMoonchy & Tobias "Atmosfere" Reviewed at Music Won't Save YouMoonchy & Tobias "Atmosfere" Reviewed at Festival...

PERTH “Where’s My Dystopia?” Reviewed at Cyclic Defrost

“Perth-based four piece band perth released their second album ‘What’s Your Utopia?’ towards the end of last year, an impressive collection that saw them veering between elements of post-rock, shoegaze and electronics whilst maintaining a cohesive sense of flow throughout. Six months on, this download-only album ‘Where’s My Dystopia?’ offers up a remix companion to that preceding album, with a diverse cast of predominantly Western Australian artists being called upon to rework the original tracks. If there’s one unifying theme here, it’s that most of the tracks here centre around gentle downtempo electronics, with the occasional undercurrent of glitchiness thrown in. Seams’ opening reworking of ‘Quantum Chronological’ sees rattling, house-tempo percussive pulse rolling alongside distorted drum samples as a rippling backdrop of glittering synths and stretched out vocal elements gets thrown through all manner of phasing, only for the snapping rhythms to suddenly drop out as feathery guitars trail out into the ether. Filter Beds meanwhile turn ‘Sunday Stroll’ into a blunted hiphop glide that drapes dreamy layers of ringing percussion and melodic bass runs over a crunching backdrop of headnod beats as delicate guitar loops begin to seep into the mix, before Mei Saraswati’s remix of ‘Collapsible Lung’ kicks things off in ghostly IDM-laced chanson territory as eerie jagged rhythms and bleeping electronics flit against chanteuse vocals, only for things to get dragged off in a smoother leftfield RNB direction by the track’s end. Elsewhere, Tame Impala / Pond’s Jay Watson makes an appearance under his GUM alias, offering up what’s perhaps the closest thing to pop here, turning ‘Drank And Kites And Tomorrow’ into an epic prog-laced...

perth "What's My Utopia?" Reviewed at Leonard's Lair

“perth are a relatively new four piece with three quarters of the band from promising post-rock act Apricot Rail whilst the remaining quarter is songwriter Matthew Dolan. This is very much a band effort of course but Dolan may be the key ingredient which could deviate the other band members from the “rockier” inclinations that threatened to undermine their good work. If they must be pigeon-holed, perth belong in the subcategory known as ambient rock but in reality this only tells a fragment of the story. Each song is lovingly arranged with contrasting layers whether it’s a keyboard wash, crying birds, breakbeats, brass or, on ‘Drank And Kites And Tomorrow’, vocals which seem to have been exhumed from some obscure psych rock act from the 1960′s. The gorgeous ‘Saw Promenade’ brings out the xylophone and its subtly romantic feel is brought to the fore by its post-rock-meets-dreamy easy listening backing. The eerie, glacial ‘Greasy Moon’ recalls the mysterious, lunar sounds of Avrocar, then there’s the curiously subdued electronica of ‘Sunday Stroll’ and the twinkling, starry beauty of ‘Collapsible Lung’. All are excellent, complex songs which seem to exist in their own universe. Even the finale ‘Viewmaster’ can’t resist a touch of weirdness as it mutates from a fairly understated acoustic rock number into an odd coda of what sounds like cuckoo clocks and then there’s a chilling hidden track characterised by choral samples and stately piano. ‘What’s Your Utopia?’ is likely to be one of the most unusual albums you will hear over the course of a year. However, whereas other bands try too hard to sound different, perth blend their...

perth "Where's Your Dystopia" Reviewed at The Music

“Perth are one of WA’s most enticing, yet mysterious and confounding, bands – not just for the un-Googleableness of their name. But it’s obvious how much they’re loved by those who know them. Their album What’s Your Utopia? catapulted Perth into the vernacular, and this remix album comes with expectation, which is met, fully. There’s a chilled house version of Sunday Stroll. GUM drives Drank And Kites And Tomorrow into a psych stratosphere, and the amazing Valerio Cosi gives Old At Heart a new lease on life. Stunning stuff, and more proof that Perth are groundbreaking.” – The Music Related Items:Target Archery "The Nomenclature of Kites" Out Now!REWNew Target Archery Single and Forthcoming AlbumLiminal Drifter - Choir on Mars"Moonchy & Tobias III" Reviewed at Louder Than...