Chloe March “Starlings & Crows” Reviewed at Ondarock

“One of those magical words that sometimes manages to capture the reader’s attention is underestimated. I find it actually difficult to call Chloë March with the term underrated, because in this case we are faced with a real neglect by critics and the public, despite the Fact that the English artist has just crossed the threshold of the fifth album (the penultimate “Amialluma” was shared with Todd Tobias). Perhaps I should not be surprised at the lack of attention paid to her so far, considering the guidelines of the music of the London singer-songwriter, more inclined to that imperceptible Hugo Largo-style rock, where the role of percussion and guitars is at least accidental. Chloë March’s evanescent and refined chamber-pop wouldn’t go unnoticed if it were published on behalf of more celebrated artists (for example, Kate Bush or David Sylvian). There is an extreme vulnerability in these eleven creations that cannot be fully appreciated without attention and patience being devoted to it. Let’s be clear that “Starlings & Crows” isn’t a difficult or pretentious album, voice whiteness and harmonies with fall and dreamlike tones are an easy language to understand and interpret. Diafane (the title track),moderately synthetic (the charming “Turn Fox Then”), rarely throbbing (the piano intonation in “All Things Good”), melodically fragile (the symphonic synth-folk of “Neon Emerald Sequin”), slightly retro (waltz time in “To A Place”), concise (the sumptuous “Remember That Sky” and the romantic “Chroma Bather”) or evanescent (“High Hay”), Chloë March’s chamber-folk and dream-pop creations are kissed by unusual beauty. “Starlings & Crows” is a record with delicate and penetrating fragrances, almost an aroma-therapy entrusted to the seven notes. There is no shortage of literary references (“Alice...

Chloe March ‘All Things Good’ Reviewed at Fifty3 Musings on Music

“It was hard not to be charmed by the beauty of Chloë March’s album, Starlings & Crows, which flew into sight in October last year. As a timely reminder of her precious talent, the English ambient-pop artiste has just shared a third single off the record, “All Things Good”. Those very familiar with her work may recognise that the song is a version of “Calypso Wants” from her previous album, Blood-Red Spark, with extended lyrics and a different arrangement. March is a confessed fan of the process of reworking as a means of improving something or continuing to explore a theme. “All Things Good” falls firmly into the second category.” – Fifty3 Musings on Music Related Items:Chloe March 'To a Place' Reviewed at Fifty3 Musings on MusicChloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed at Music Won't Save YouNew Chloe March Single - 'All Things Good'Chloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed by Craig Laurance GidneyChloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed at...

Chloe March ‘All Things Good’ Reviewed at Fresh on the Net

“I first heard the unique and otherworldly music of Chloë March on Tom Ravenscroft’s BBC 6 Music Show some 6 or 7 years ago. Little did I know that we would later become friends and we would both, in different roles, become stalwarts of Fresh On The Net. In that time she has continued to produce a consistent catalogue of beautifully-crafted songs and accomplished albums, recording for the Australian label Hidden Shoals. She has also repeatedly won the approval of our discerning readers who have regularly voted her tracks into the Fresh Faves. All Good Things is a prime example of what Chloë does so well. The piano develops in waves of alternating, fluid chords that make room for the kind of sumptuous dissonances rarely heard on a pop record. The other sounds swirl and saunter around it, while her soft but distinct and assured voice takes hold; a subtle and savoury main course, adorned by a plateful of carefully contrasting side dishes. The song is reflective, melancholy and tugs at the heartstrings. But never does it dip down into sugary sentiment, and it is all the more emotionally powerful as a result.” – Neil March, Fresh on the Net Related Items:Chloe March 'To a Place' Reviewed at Trust The DocTodd Tobias & Chloe March 'Lallulow' Reviewed at Trust The DocChloe March 'To a Place' Reviewed at Fresh on the NetChloe March 'Snow Bird' Reviewed at Trust The DocNew Chloe March Single - 'All Things...

Chloe March “Starlings and Crows” In Best of Mark Griffin’s Best of 2020

“A stunningly lovely blend of electronic and orchestral jewel tones, sensitive vocals and diaphanous compositions, this record envelops and holds you to its chest where you can feel its beating heart.” – Mark Griffin Related Items:Chloe March's "Starlings & Crows" in Mark Griffin's Best of 2020!New Chloe March Single - 'All Things Good'Chloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed by Craig Laurance GidneyChloe March "Starlings & Crows" Reviewed at Music Won't Save YouChloe March's "Starlings & Crows" in the Curve Ball Top 30 for...

Chloe March “Starlings & Crows” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

The eleven tracks of “Starlings & Crows” are the result of an immediate and very sophisticated elaboration process, which derives from the comparison with places and personal memories, filtered by an approach of enchanted candor, faithfully reflected by soft synthetic stratifications, marked by occasional pulses and fragile watermarks of notes. The delicacy and apparent vulnerability that transpire from the work are paired with the clear awareness of Chloë March in her vivid dream-pop emissions, arising from an undoubtedly personal dimension but calmly aimed at universal emotional spaces.