Chloe March ‘Calypso Wants’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

Utterly enchanting, snow fallen beguilement courtesy of Chloe March. Second single from her recent Hidden Shoal full length ‘blood red spark’, this be ‘Calypso Wants’ – a beautifully harvested lunar lullaby delicately tripped and teased in the subtle spray and vibrant fusion of jazz noir dialects, torch lit tailoring and ethereal electronic murmurs all sweetly stationed between the flutter by advances of Laetitia Sadier and the dreamy demurs of Musetta and Heather Duby, simply arresting.

Chloe March “Blood-Red Spark” Reviewed at Textura

Chloë March’s many strengths are on full display throughout her fourth full-length Blood-Red Spark. On the album’s twelve tracks, her first-rate songwriting skills are well-accounted for, as is the English artist’s talent for crafting compelling instrumental backdrops. But as we’ve noted in the past, it’s March’s singing that is her music’s strongest selling-point: she’s got one of those one-in-a-million voices that could make even the most pedestrian lyric feel like cause for rapture. That being said, as integral as her vocalizing is to the album’s impact, Blood-Red Spark would hardly merit a recommendation if the songs and arrangements weren’t compelling, too.

Chloe March ‘Calypso Wants’ in Underground of Happiness Best of 2017

The latest album by Chloe March is another heady trip through electro pop but really that tag doesn’t do justice to the range of expression. The air is thick with atmosphere throughout and March is a masterful creator of mood. This is just one of the stunning rarefied synth compositions topped with layers of her remarkable voice. I particularly love the dappled pulse of electric piano when the pace picks up for the chorus. It is also a beautiful sound somewhere between The Blue Nile and David Sylvian and as that would suggest very soulful. Wonderbar.

Chloe March “Blood-Red Spark” Reviewed at Music Won’t Save You

On the fourth album, Chloë March does not stop dispensing the charm of her soothing vocal harmonies, which in the twelve tracks of “Blood-Red Spark” become even more ethereal and evanescent than ever.

Set aside the velvety jazzy settings of ” Nights Bright Days ” (2014), the sound flow that supports the interpretations of the English artist is no longer made up of real arrangements, but rather of constant layers of synth whose lightness recalls the magic of Cocteau More delicate twins.

Simplicity and intimacy seem to be the key words of the work, which however do not contradict the refined refinement of the current expressive dimension of Chloë March, a well-established muse of dilated dream-pop spells.

Chloe March ‘Let It All In’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

There may come a time when upon encountering new groove from Chloe March, descriptions such as enchanting and beguiling might prove superfluous, not on this occasion though. A new album, ‘blood red spark’ incoming on the adored Hidden Shoal, from off which ‘let it all in’ has been sent as a herald. A dream like visitation caressed in a twinkling neo classical torch toned wooziness, its delicate folk framing genteelly hushed and seductively surrendered in an evensong intimacy all lost in a moment of reflection. For here an ethereal whispering and the poetic dance of demurred expressionism and ghost lit tenderness forge a quietly alluring waltz whose forlorn crush sighs amid the glow of noir breezed dissipates. And while the press release might rightly point that its beautified and amorphous craft owes to the other worldly spectral reach of both David Sylvian and C Duncan, we here however, are much minded of an unusually vulnerable Jane Weaver sweetly shimmering in the grooves.

“Eat Your Friends” Compilation Reviewed at DOA

“Over almost a decade, Hidden Shoal records developed a reputation as a consistently innovative and experimental music label, giving to us music of remarkable qualities whether it was the instrumental excursions of Gilded, the blissed-out indie of My Majestic...