Slow Dancing Society “The Torchlight Parade Vol. II” Reviewed at Long Live Vinyl

“Following a companion volume released this spring, Washington-based Drew Sullivan continues to confirm his status as a master of instrumental melodic ambience. As its title suggests, the Torchlight Parade series is ideally suited to night-time listening, with synths sparkling over the minimal beats of The Ridpath like something by the foolishly undervalued Marconi Union, and the exquisite Monroe threatening to storm like Mogwai, but instead exercising a soothing restraint worthy of The Album Leaf. Browne’s Addition, meanwhile, offers rich, slow-paced synth chords recalling the late-80s instrumental work of David Sylvian – most notably Gone To Earth. Other leftfield 80s analogies are also appropriate: Marycliff adds echoing, Durutti Column-style guitar chords to its mysteriously mournful atmosphere, and there are, inevitably, echoes of Eno’s More Music For Films on Skagit and The Campbell House. That the collection also recalls the comedown music of the mid 1990s underlines its timeless appeal.” – Long Live Vinyl (Wyndham Wallace) Related Items:Slow Dancing Society "Fantosmes" Out Now (Vinyl, Tape, CD & Digital)Slow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Out Now!Slow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Reviewed at TexturaThree Hidden Shoal Albums in Textura's Best of 2018!Slow Dancing Society's "The Dream Council" Out...

Slow Dancing Society “The Torchlight Parade Vol. II” Reviewed at Textura

“Mere months after Drew Sullivan (aka Slow Dancing Society) issued The Torchlight Parade‘s first volume, the second appears to complete the project in exemplary manner. Certainly each holds up magnificently as a stand-alone illustration of contemporary ambient sound design, but experiencing them together makes the strongest possible impression. Adding to the project’s allure is a double-vinyl presentation that sees lime green and silver discs housed within a beautiful gatefold sleeve. Twelve years on from the release of his auspicious debut, The Sound of Lights When Dim, Sullivan has brought his creative skills and artistic sensibilities to exceptionally high levels on this latest collection. As stated in the review of the first volume, the twenty-seven-track opus provides an encompassing portrait of this distinguished ambient-electronic artist. The second volume doesn’t simply extend the project with variations on the first’s tracks. Instead, while there’s overlap between the parts in terms of sound design and general concept, there’s a critical difference between them: the sense of unease and tension pervading the inaugural set is countered by resolution and calm in the second. As the project’s denouement, it’s as critical a part of the work as the first half, the two combining to create a powerful sense of completeness. Like its predecessor, the second volume references in its track titles site-specific details associated with Sullivan’s home town of Spokane, Washington, a move that amplifies the project’s personal resonance. Compared to the first part, the pieces on the second volume are a tad quieter, subdued even, which also lends them a rather furtive, clandestine quality. Listening to Sullivan’s nocturnal tapestries, one visualizes an insomniac in...

Slow Dancing Society “Prologue: The Magic Lantern” Reviewed at The Burning Ear

“Following up last year’s TERRIFIC release (it made my top 10 albums of the year!) “My Blue Heaven”, Slow Dancing Society has returned with “Prologue: The Magic Lantern.” With “These Dreams of Fire Burned Out”, Drew sets out to (successfully) prove drone can be beautiful. Sludgy, yet heady, drones fill the space of the track while still being immensely beautiful in a dark, heavy way. In the latter section, Drew’s signature fire-tinged guitar work sparsely shines through, adding yet another sonic layer to this complex, and emotional journey of a track.” – The Burning Ear Related Items:Slow Dancing Society's "The Dream Council" Out NowSlow Dancing Society "Fantosmes" Out Now (Vinyl, Tape, CD & Digital)Kramies "Of All the Places Been & Everything the End" Reviewed at The Grey LanternNew Slow Dancing Society Single, Album in AprilThree Hidden Shoal Albums in Textura's Best of...

Slow Dancing Society ‘Lilacs’ Reviewd at The Burning Ear

“Lilacs” must have been locked in a time capsule for a while, because it’s straight out of a 90’s high school prom – in the best possible way. We suggest pulling someone special close to you and reminiscing on your favorite Buffy The Vampire Slayer episodes. Or which Soundgarden album is the most underrated. Or pro tips on keeping your Tamagotchi alive. Just try not to step on each other’s Doc Martens.

Slow Dancing Society “The Best Days of Our Lives” Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

“still with hidden shoal, a newly peeled offering from Slow Dancing Society entitled ‘II – the best days of our lives’ has been the subject of a fair amount of swooning around here not least track 2 which incidentally is the title cut, a beautifully caressing slice of lights lowered nocturnal mellowness oozed and snoozed in tripping riff ripples of reclining bliss bathes all affectionately ghosted in a Robin Guthrie like tenderly coiling intimacy.” – The Sunday Experience Related Items:New Slow Dancing Society Single, Album in AprilSlow Dancing Society "Fantosmes" Out Now (Vinyl, Tape, CD & Digital)Slow Dancing Society's "The Dream Council" Out NowSlow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Out Now!Pledge and Get Slow Dancing Society's "The Dusk Recital" on...

Slow Dancing Society “Night Takes Day” Reviewed at Opus

“The title of Slow Dancing Society’s latest EP is rather apropos: the languid guitar lines and sparkling synthesizers create a sense of day passing into night, of sunlight giving way to a mysterious, even dangerous darkness. “Remember, Love” easily sets the mood, as Drew Sullivan’s guitar lines shimmer and reflect off of dark electronic undercurrents. In keeping with the song’s title, there’s a nostalgic sense — but the guitar notes reveal an edge in the song’s final moments that keeps it from growing too sentimental. Those undercurrents reappear on “Pulsing Amber,” this time evoking empty city streets coated in a slick of rain and neon light. Meanwhile, “Do You Want to Get out of Here“‘s gentle synthwave wouldn’t be out of place on the Stranger Things soundtrack. Finally, the EP ends on a harrowing note with the creepy synths and roiling guitar distortion of “The Morning After,” which suggest something ominous took place the night before. At only 16 minutes, these songs can seem more like sketches, but to Sullivan’s credit, each one feels fully-formed (and, at the risk of sounding clichéd, like imaginary film scores) — each capable of firing one’s imagination enough to wonder what keeps happening after the music ends, and the morning returns.” – Opus Related Items:Slow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Reviewed at TexturaSlow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Reviewed at Long Live VinylSlow Dancing Society "Fantosmes" Out Now (Vinyl, Tape, CD & Digital)Slow Dancing Society's "The Dream Council" Out NowSlow Dancing Society "The Torchlight Parade Vol. II" Out...