Slow Dancing Society ‘Lilacs’ Reviewd at The Burning Ear

Lilacs” must have been locked in a time capsule for a while, because it’s straight out of a 90’s high school prom – in the best possible way. We suggest pulling someone special close to you and reminiscing on your favorite Buffy The Vampire Slayer episodes. Or which Soundgarden album is the most underrated. Or pro tips on keeping your Tamagotchi alive. Just try not to step on each other’s Doc Martens.

AWMA ‘Sterling Hayden and the Great Nobility’ Reviewed at Overblown

Sterling Hayden was an American actor who starred in such classics as Dr. Strangelove and The Long Goodbye. No idea what that has to do with this experimental rock/post-rock jam from trio AWMA. Regardless, the song is a trippy and hypnotic adventure that eschews convention to craft a sound that sits somewhere between the unpredictability of a jam band and the careful consideration of the best post-rock groups. This one has a mantra like quality that imbues the track with a religious vibe that is equally endearing and unnerving. The outfit features ex-members of the San Francisco-based slow-core outfit Half Film. Which is nice.

Willem Gator “Locked-In Syndrome” Reviewed at Wicked Style

From the Italian producer Willem Gator comes an eclectic album of epic melancholic electronica, poised between post rock and clubbing sonority, full of dreamy musical constructions, along six different tracks, for a total of 40 minutes, modulating softly and with cinematic digressions , in now more eclectic passages, at other times more tense and eccentric, always with a strong emotional impact. Giuseppe Musmeci, this is the name of the musician’s registry, he chose for the Locked-In Syndrome project the Hidden Shoal, an independent Australian label that has focused its work on experimenters and bands not related to a specific genre. The result is interesting and worthy of careful listening.

Willem Gator “Locked-In Syndrome” Reviewed at Global Music Magazine

Carried by a strong rhythmic foundation and steeped in audacious sounds, it is possible to describe the new album by the Italian Giuseppe Musmeci, who, as author, however, states the project Willem Gator.

He has baptized his work “Locked-In Syndrome”. Probably because his music sounds like it’s breaking out of the corset of the musical mainstream. Obviously, Willem Gator refuses to swim, copy, and search for what matters best. Occasionally, his beats and synth sounds sound as if he wants to prove that noncomformance can lead to catchy music.

With catchy music we do not mean pop music, so nothing that immediately and immediately like. Everything, just do not adapt, is more the motto of the Italian. He does not move so much offside with his pulsating drum loops and feverish sequencer lines. So far from the fact that she quickly gets in the ear, his music is not at all. Rather, only a small thing is missing. This charming game, as if to say that I could, if I wanted, mastered Giuseppe Musmeci perfectly.

So he drives his fun for almost 40 minutes. As a listener, you are in the end sweaty about the merciless force of this music. When game consoles dance to steamrams, it must sound like “Locked-In Syndrome”. Wow!

Chloe March ‘Let It All In’ Reviewed at The Sunday Experience

There may come a time when upon encountering new groove from Chloe March, descriptions such as enchanting and beguiling might prove superfluous, not on this occasion though. A new album, ‘blood red spark’ incoming on the adored Hidden Shoal, from off which ‘let it all in’ has been sent as a herald. A dream like visitation caressed in a twinkling neo classical torch toned wooziness, its delicate folk framing genteelly hushed and seductively surrendered in an evensong intimacy all lost in a moment of reflection. For here an ethereal whispering and the poetic dance of demurred expressionism and ghost lit tenderness forge a quietly alluring waltz whose forlorn crush sighs amid the glow of noir breezed dissipates. And while the press release might rightly point that its beautified and amorphous craft owes to the other worldly spectral reach of both David Sylvian and C Duncan, we here however, are much minded of an unusually vulnerable Jane Weaver sweetly shimmering in the grooves.